Harvard square, Cambridge, MA.: Raven Used bookstore now re-opened

On October, 15, 2015, Raven Used Books moved into its new home at 23 Church Street.  Great space.  The small store has already sold more than 1500 books in the first 3 days (but there are plenty others to be shelved).  feel free to contact us at: ravencambridge@hotmail.com

john petrovatoravenchurchinterior

Marissa Nadler brings ‘dark and dreamy’ tunes to Portsmouth Book & Bar

By Christopher Hislop of Seacost online.
March 06, 2014 2:00 AM

Don’t call Marissa Nadler a folk musician. Her music is much more cinematic than that.

Take John Fahey, toss him in a blender with Patti Smith, whisk in some of the imagery found in dreams of the darker variety, slowly incorporate wistfully presented lyrics sung in the mezzo-soprano range, soak it all in a healthy dash of reverb, and you’re starting to scratch the surface of the brand of music Nadler is creating.

WHAT Marissa Nadler

WHEN 9 p.m. Sunday, March 9

WHERE Book & Bar, 40 Pleasant St., Portsmouth

COST $10

CONTACT 427-9197 orwww.bookandbar.com

Touring in support of her latest album, “July,” which came out Feb. 10 — her eighth album to date, Nadler will bag up her dark and dreamy tunes and travel north from the great state of Massachusetts for an appearance at the Portsmouth Book & Bar on Sunday, March 9.

SPOTLIGHT: Music. What is it good for? Why do you seek it? Why do you create it?

NADLER: A world without it wouldn’t be nearly as beautiful.

SPOTLIGHT: Music. Describe the sounds that you cook up.

NADLER: Atmospheric, subtle, heavy, dark, rooted in folk with shoegaze, country, and black metal infusions.

SPOTLIGHT: Your latest record is called “July.” Why? How do you feel about March? In particular New England style Marches — the weather, not the movement …

NADLER: The record documents one July to the next, and it was recorded in July. It couldn’t be further removed from a “summer” record. I like March in New England towards the end, when winter finally leaves us and the flowers begin to bloom.

SPOTLIGHT: What are you looking for a listener to take with them when they experience one of your records or your live show?

NADLER: Seeing music live is always more imperfect and more personal. There’s nothing polished. I think it can be more emotionally resonant to see a musician in the flesh.

SPOTLIGHT: When you walk into a bookstore that has a bar what’s the first thing you do? Crack a book, or hoist a pint?

NADLER: I don’t drink anymore. So it’s going to have to be a book!

SPOTLIGHT: What can fans expect when they come out to see you at the Portsmouth Book & Bar on March 9?

NADLER: Well, I don’t believe I’ve ever played in New Hampshire! Maybe once …; so I’m really not sure what to expect from people! I will be joined by cellist Janel Leppin, who will also play synth and sing some of the harmony vocals that are so prevalent on “July.”

Portsmouth Book and Bar reviewed in New Hampshire Business Magazine

 

News

Portsmouth Bars Put New Twist on Beer
Published Thursday, February 14, 2013

 

 

Portsmouth has long been known for its young, hip atmosphere and nightlife, so it takes creativity to stand out. Two new establishments are creating a buzz with beer: Earth Eagle Brewings, a nanobrewery with a tasting room that hung out its shingle in November on High Street; and Portsmouth Book and Bar, a used bookstore with a restaurant and bar, which opened on Pleasant Street in December.

While combining a bookstore and bar may be novel for Portsmouth, it’s nothing new for John Petrovato and his business partners, Jon Strymish and David Lovelace. The trio opened Montagne Book Mill 15 years ago in western Massachusetts, and it is still running. Petrovato also owns Raven’s Used Books in Cambridge and Boston, which he says had its best year ever in 2012. Still, the bookstore business is difficult. “I probably wouldn’t have come to Portsmouth and just opened a bookstore because rents are very high here and the bookstore market is a little bit smaller than it used to be,” Petrovato says. “Having the other revenue streams helps us be able to do this.”

Portsmouth Book and Bar, which employs 12 people, stocks more than 15,000 used books that sell for 50 to 80 percent off the cover price. While perusing books, patrons can also enjoy a meal and select from eight bottled beers and a dozen wines. Petrovato says it will take years to recoup the upfront investment, but initial book sales are better than expected. The store sold more than 4,000 books in December, according to its Facebook page on Jan. 4.

New Hampshire has more than its fair share of brewpubs and breweries, and while microbrews have been de rigueur, nanobrews have become the latest trend. Earth Eagle Brewings turned a hobby into a business, offering a tasting room that’s become standing room only. “We were trying to figure out how could we get into the game for the smallest amount of money. That’s where the tasting room idea came up,” says Butch Heilshorn, who co-owns the brewery with Alexander McDonald, co-owner of A & G Homebrew Supply in Portsmouth, where Earth Eagle Brewings is located.

The tasting room is open Thursday through Sunday. Heilshorn and McDonald aim to have six beers on tap, and Heilshorn says the 20-person capacity room is often full. The nanobrewery has one 31-gallon barrel for brewing. The beer costs $1 for a 4-ounce taste, the size allowed by law, but they are working on legislative efforts to increase that.

Customers can buy the take-home version in either 32- or 64-oz. growlers (jugs). Heilshorn says the pair had been home brewing for a few years. One thing that makes their beer unique is that some varieties are brewed with herbs called gruits, instead of hops, the traditional ingredient. “It’s almost like people don’t think it’s beer without hops in it, but for centuries no beer had hops,” he says. To learn more, visit eartheaglebrewings.blogspot.com or Portsmouth Book and Bar on Facebook.