Roger Miller brings Surrealistic game night to Portsmouth Book & Bar

The very word “surreal” is an appropriate summation of guitarist, composer, artist and gamer Roger Clark Miller.

His interests have taken him on a path of existence that would be very hard to make up. From his days as a co-founder of seminal Boston rockers Mission of Burma, to the heady arrangements constructed by the Alloy Orchestra, and all of his musical endeavors in between, Miller knows no artistic bounds. Chase that which calls to you and navigate as best you can. Let the muse be your guide.

When Miller sets foot in Portsmouth Book & Bar on Saturday, May 17, he’ll be continuing to carve out another path he’s ventured down lately: that of the coordinator of his very own surrealistic games night.

The evening also will showcase his DJ skills, as he’ll provide the soundtrack to the night’s events.

If there’s any certainty of what will occur on Saturday, it’s that no matter what preconceived idea one may have in mind as to what may occur, the evening will definitely be out of the ordinary.

SPOTLIGHT: Tell me a bit about the evening you have planned. What inspired you to create this type of event?

MILLER: When I delved into Surrealism in the mid-70s, I found a way to create dream-like settings without the psychedelics, if you know what I mean. My friends and I would play the “Exquisite Corpse” drawing game on a regular basis. I expanded my interest in Surrealism during Mission of Burma (see our first 45, “Max Ernst”), and incorporated imagery and stories from my dreams in the lyrics. As I delved further, I discovered the word games, frottage drawing (using a pencil or other drawing tool to make a rubbing over a textured surface), and my son ended up creating “The Dream Game” for his fifth-grade project in Quincy (Mass.)! This “Dream Game” is played on a board with dice: by following the directions on the board you spontaneously write down a very phantasmagorical/dream-story, and it really works.

So eventually I had a good pile of games that I enjoyed playing with my friends, so why not do it in public? So far I’ve done it at Mass MoCA (Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art), Real Art Ways in Hartford, Conn., and the I.C.A. (Institute of Contemporary Art) in Boston. It’s always great fun.

The setting is that everyone sits at a table supplied with paper and drawing/writing tools. I explain the “Exquisite Corpse” drawing game, and people go at it! I stroll the tables explaining the various word games, and explaining the rules to the “Dream Game” and how to utilize frottage drawing to create interesting visual compositions. An extra plus is that everyone at a table quickly gets to know each other as they play the games.

The more you put into it, the more you get out of it. It’s up to the players, really. I love walking by tables and no one is talking, they’re all concentrating on writing words or drawing. Then when the paper is full, they open the paper up and read the surrealist sentences to each other or show the drawings. It’s really a blast, and sometimes astounding results are achieved, all through surrealist activities. Of course, these are the same games the Surrealists played in the ’20s and ’30s in Paris and other places.

SPOTLIGHT: The other element of interest here is the fact that you DJ these events. Tell us a bit about the soundtrack you provide. How does music enhance the overall experience?

MILLER: A very wide variety of music and styles will be included. From rock, there’s Roxy Music and Brian Eno’s early work, some Mission of Burma songs qualify, especially with my use of dreams in lyrics. Both the “Dream Interpretations” from my “Elemental Guitar” CD, and music from some of my other bands: Exquisite Corpse (of course!) and with my brothers Benjamin and Laurence, M2 and M3. Of course John Cage, Steve Reich, and some just abstract sounds. Not all of this music is ‘technically surrealistic,’ but it suits the evening. Often people will come up to me and ask what piece is playing. I like that.

Basically the music is mildly disorienting — helpful for surrealist activities — and encouraging towards the unusual — also helpful for surrealist activities. Often abstract.

SPOTLIGHT: What do you know about the Book & Bar? What excites you about producing this event at the venue?

MILLER: I know (co-founder) Jon Strymish — isn’t that enough? He has taken a number of pretty cool photos of Mission of Burma, the Binary System, and other ensembles I’ve been in. On the CD called “Monsoon” — me; William Hooker and Lee Ranaldo (from Sonic Youth) — most of the photos are by Jon. I like his style. I figure his club would have style as well, based on that. I’ve heard nothing but good stuff about the place, and it seems a great venue for the games. Good size, casual vibe, high-quality beer!

SPOTLIGHT: Do you have any history with Portsmouth, N.H.? Did Mission of Burma ever play the (late) Elvis Room by chance?

MILLER: The Alloy Orchestra has played The Music Hall on a couple of occasions, always fun. I don’t think Burma played Portsmouth, but I can’t always recall where we played way back in the day (1979-1983). It kind of p——- me off that my bands don’t play New Hampshire much, so here’s a chance to change that, even if this ain’t a band …

SPOTLIGHT: What are you looking for people to take with them when they experience an event of this nature? What’s the communal feel?

MILLER: That by working together you can create something totally unexpected. The end result is inherently collective. The Surrealists claimed that the unconscious/subconscious of the players was revealed, and I have found that, to some degree, that is definitely true. I’ve walked by tables where people are discussing why they drew a particular image, based on what was going on in their life. And it’s just plain downright fun in a social fashion. Everyone’s making art, even if they don’t normally do that! What’s the problem with that? Nothin’ but fun.

The Surrealist games inherently produce imagery rubbing up against imagery that wouldn’t normally happen. So one sees connections in things one normally wouldn’t think of. I believe that is useful in day-to-day life, to make life more interesting. The unexpected — it can be marvelous.

SPOTLIGHT: What is the most surreal experience you’ve had while hosting one of these events?

MILLER: For me it’s mostly work! For three hours I don’t stop talking and explaining and listening to people’s word-games or looking at their drawings. Honestly, most of my life it’s about ME creating things. Here, it’s about me supplying the experience to OTHERS, making it easy for them to create. I love it, actually. When I see participants amazed at what they created, or just laughing at them, that makes me totally happy. I love seeing things being created, by myself or others. But I’m usually pretty tired by the end of the three hours! Probably the most surreal part of these events is the dreams I’ll have later that night …

Says the aforementioned Strymish: I’m really excited about this event …; Watching Roger play guitar in Mission of Burma when I was 17 was a life-changing experience, and seeing his integrity and thoughtfulness in everything he’s done since has been an inspiration. So I am stoked to be able to bring this to Portsmouth and see the inspiration go forward.

 

Yankee magazine awards Portsmouth Book and Bar as best new bookstore 2014

BEST NEW BOOKSTORE:
BOOK & BAR, Portsmouth

Owners John Petrovato, Jon Strymish, and David Lovelace realize that books and beer or wine are even better together. Pick from high-quality used books while sampling from their menu of beers, wines, gourmet sandwiches, and pastries. 40 Pleasant St. 603-427-9197; bookandbar.com

 

 

 

http://www.yankeemagazine.com/best-of-new-england/best-new-hampshire-attractions-2014

 

 

Book and Bar makes “top reasons to visit Portsmouth, NH”

Known for the tax-free shopping, the waterfront views, and the historic sites, the city of Portsmouth sits just 60 miles north of Boston. Nestled near the mouth of the Piscataqua River, it stretches 16.8 square miles. The population is 21,233.

The history: Settled in 1623, Portsmouth prides itself on being the nation’s third oldest city. It served as an epicenter for the rail and sea industries and was a focal point on the Eastern seaboard until the late 1800s. The Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (across the river in Maine) was established in 1800 as the country’s first naval shipyard. Today, the region is noted for its beautiful historic charm and many attractions. For example, the USS Albacore Museum is a retired 1953 US Navy submarine, giving visitors a glimpse at life on the water. TheStrawberry Banke Museum is another popular family site. The outdoor museum covers 10 acres and traces Portsmouth’s earliest English settlement’s history through the many historic houses and exhibits.

The shopping: Downtown Portsmouth is lined with cute boutiques and shops.. Walk down Congress Street and circle around the many side streets for a variety of art, antiques, clothing, local goodies, books, fine jewelry, and more. Market Square is located in the center of downtown and is the start of many local walking tours. Visit the galleries, browse the old-fashioned shops, and explore 0ne of the many 17th-century buildings. Tugboat Alley is considered a local tradition, with nautical-themed gifts and collectibles for all ages. The Book and Bar is located in the Old Custom House, offering a relaxed, no-media atmosphere with a wide selection of used books and small cafe. The best part about shopping in Portsmouth? No sales tax.

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The Portsmouth waterfront, overlooking the Piscataqua River. Trip Advisor

The harbor: The seaport city overlooks the mouth of the beautiful Piscataqua River, a short, wide river that divides New Hampshire and Maine. Take a guided tour or walk solo along thePortsmouth Harbor Trail. The path passes more than 70 historic and scenic sites and provides a taste of the local charm and culture. Another great way to take in the scenes is by boat. Board one of the daily scheduledPortsmouth Harbor Cruises, narrated tours where guests learn about local wildlife, folklore, and waterway history.

Prescott Park: Established by former resident, Josie F. Prescott, this gorgeous waterfront attraction provides a free and accessible public park to residents and visitors. Stretching along the river from State Street to Mechanic Street, Prescott Parkis over 10 acres of lush flower gardens, walkways, seating, and grass areas designated for recreation. Perfect for a picnic visit. The “formal garden” showcases fountains, tree-lined walkways, a flower wall, and a rose garden. In the summer months, the park is home to the Prescott Park Art Festival, a series of outdoor musical performances, plays, and a juried art show.

The food: Whether you’re in the mood for fine dining or a casual bite, Portsmouth has a ton of tasty options for any foodie. The city is home to dozens of restaurants featuring just about every cuisine imaginable.Lexie’s Joint is a laidback burger joint with a twist, serving up classic burger recipies or a make-your-own burger option. It also has a variety of grilled items and melts. Shio is another popular pick, featuring classic Japanese fare from sushi to Shumai. A great go-to is the Friendly Toast. Located on Congress Street, the family-friendly restaurant serves breakfast all day and a range of tasty and unique sandwiches and main dishes.

 

Press for our Marissa Nadler show at Portsmouth Book and Bar

 

Portland Phoenix:  One of the new crop of emotionally dripping, hard-hitting dream-folk artists to come along the last few years, MARISSA NADLER has, along with artists like Jolie Holland, Liz Harris, and Sharon Van Etten, carved out some necessary new terrain among US folk scenes, infusing the craft with gothic sensibilities and irreverent existential hangups. It’s good fun. Nadler’s new record, July, reaffirms her place among this unique set, and seeing her perform its songs should be plenty memorable at Portsmouth Book and Bar, 9 pm; $10 at 40 Pleasant St. in Portsmouth, NH. 617.908.8277.

http://portland.thephoenix.com/Events/236635-Marissa-Nadler/

 

New Hampshire public radio:

The Boston Globe describes MarissaNadler‘s  voice as “an intoxicating soprano drenched in gauzy reverb that hits bell-clear heights, lingers, and tapers off like rings of smoke.”

On Sunday, March 9th, Marissa Nadler will be performing at the Portsmouth Book and Bar. Producer Zach Nugent spoke with Marissa and asked why her new album is called July, when her music is often described as dark, sparse, and even frosty.

http://nhpr.org/post/marissa-nadler

Marissa Nadler brings ‘dark and dreamy’ tunes to Portsmouth Book & Bar

By Christopher Hislop of Seacost online.
March 06, 2014 2:00 AM

Don’t call Marissa Nadler a folk musician. Her music is much more cinematic than that.

Take John Fahey, toss him in a blender with Patti Smith, whisk in some of the imagery found in dreams of the darker variety, slowly incorporate wistfully presented lyrics sung in the mezzo-soprano range, soak it all in a healthy dash of reverb, and you’re starting to scratch the surface of the brand of music Nadler is creating.

WHAT Marissa Nadler

WHEN 9 p.m. Sunday, March 9

WHERE Book & Bar, 40 Pleasant St., Portsmouth

COST $10

CONTACT 427-9197 orwww.bookandbar.com

Touring in support of her latest album, “July,” which came out Feb. 10 — her eighth album to date, Nadler will bag up her dark and dreamy tunes and travel north from the great state of Massachusetts for an appearance at the Portsmouth Book & Bar on Sunday, March 9.

SPOTLIGHT: Music. What is it good for? Why do you seek it? Why do you create it?

NADLER: A world without it wouldn’t be nearly as beautiful.

SPOTLIGHT: Music. Describe the sounds that you cook up.

NADLER: Atmospheric, subtle, heavy, dark, rooted in folk with shoegaze, country, and black metal infusions.

SPOTLIGHT: Your latest record is called “July.” Why? How do you feel about March? In particular New England style Marches — the weather, not the movement …

NADLER: The record documents one July to the next, and it was recorded in July. It couldn’t be further removed from a “summer” record. I like March in New England towards the end, when winter finally leaves us and the flowers begin to bloom.

SPOTLIGHT: What are you looking for a listener to take with them when they experience one of your records or your live show?

NADLER: Seeing music live is always more imperfect and more personal. There’s nothing polished. I think it can be more emotionally resonant to see a musician in the flesh.

SPOTLIGHT: When you walk into a bookstore that has a bar what’s the first thing you do? Crack a book, or hoist a pint?

NADLER: I don’t drink anymore. So it’s going to have to be a book!

SPOTLIGHT: What can fans expect when they come out to see you at the Portsmouth Book & Bar on March 9?

NADLER: Well, I don’t believe I’ve ever played in New Hampshire! Maybe once …; so I’m really not sure what to expect from people! I will be joined by cellist Janel Leppin, who will also play synth and sing some of the harmony vocals that are so prevalent on “July.”

Marissa Nadler to play at Portsmouth Book and Bar! Sunday, March 9th, 9 pm.

One of my favorite musicians will be performing at book and bar, a one year old shop that i co-own.  Amazing vocals and songwriting.

Pitchfork recently reviewed her latest album:

The question of whether Marissa Nadler‘s elegant folk music ought to soundtrack our dreams or haunt our nightmares has been a thread through her uncannily cohesive catalogue. With six albums in 10 years and never a misstep, Nadler has grown her own perceptive language—she’s an old-soul lost in time like Sibylle Baier, but her music is blackened and more literary. Her songs have come steeped in misery and macabre, cobwebs and ashes, but Nadler is not a doomy aesthete merely for gloom’s sake. She is devoted to Leonard Cohen and Joni Mitchell, and her music understands folk tradition. While her songs sound isolated and spiritually vintage, as if beamed from the grayscale interior of a Victorian home, her stories have been generous, selfless tales, heavy with metaphor and imagery. Nadler’s poetic temperament and steady grace point to a darkness within us all—though her singing always seems to hone on mortality not for the purpose of crushing, existential missives, but in order to protect us.